Use (including viewing) of the material contained herein constitutes acceptance of the Terms of Use.
  • Home
  • > Race Comments
Race Comments

GUIDE TO RACE COMMENTS


A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z |


All Out
When a horse has the lead and is under extreme pressure to hold off another rival.
Allowed To Settle
When a horse is unhurried during the early stages of a race and allowed to gain his best stride.
Altered Course
Used during the running of a race when a horse has to change paths. Generally used in the stretch run.
Angled In
When the rider on an unimpeded horse elects to alter his mount's running path inside to avoid potential congestion. This generally occurs when the horse is entering the stretch and is a gradual move.
Angled Out
When the rider on an unimpeded horse elects to alter his mount's running path outside to avoid potential congestion. This generally occurs when the horse is entering the stretch and is a gradual move.
As Rider Pleased
When a horse has the victory secured and the margin of victory is determined by the amount of pressure exerted by the rider.
Assumed Command
When a horse gains the lead at any point during the race. It should be used in conjunction with a position on the track (e.g. assumed command quarter pole).
Attempted To Wheel
Term used at the start. It is used when a horse ducks either in or out sharply. The horse crosses over at least three stall lengths in front of the starting gate, then is straightened away. He should be WELL behind the rest of the field after being straightened.
Away Alertly
Term used at the start. This term should only be used when horses break MUCH quicker than the rest of the field. There should not be more than one or two horses that break sharply in the same race. THIS COMMENT IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH BROKE SHARPLY.
Best Stride Late
When a horse is generally outrun during the early stages, then gets into gear too late to overtake the leaders. He finishes with good energy and in most instances, is moving fastest at the wire.
Between Horses
Self explanatory.
Bid, Hung
Used during the running of a race when a horse drives up alongside the leader(s) and looks like he is going to emerge as the winner, then cannot gain further on the leaders and finishes evenly.
Bled
When a horse bleeds from the nostrils either during the running of a race, or when returning to be unsaddled. Note : It is always a good idea to check to see if a horse has bled if he stops suddenly during the race.
Blocked
Used when a horse tries to make a move during the race and has no room to run due to the fact that there are horses in front of him. Generally, when horses are blocked, they have to be steadied and those two comments commonly are used together. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH BOXED.
Bobbled
This term is used primarily at the start, but can be used in other instances. Horses bobble when they break awkwardly when in tight quarters. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH BROKE IN A TANGLE OR STUMBLED.
Bolted
Used on the turns when a horse bears out sharply. This term is more severe than BORE OUT due to the fact that he bears out very quickly and ends up well past the middle of the track.
Bore In
Applies when a horse continues to move inward in a quick, uncontrolled move. This term can be seen best when reviewing the head on shot on the video tape replays. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH LUGGED IN.
Bore Out
This term is the exact opposite of BORE IN.
Boxed
See BLOCKED.
Brief Foot
When a horse shows speed during the early stages of a race, then tires.
Brief Speed
Used when a horse shows some early speed, then backs out of contention.
Broke Down
When a horse experiences severe physical problems with their legs. They are limping badly or have limbs off the ground. Horses that break down are either humanely destroyed or must be removed from the track in the horse ambulance.
Broke In Air
Used at the start. When a horse's front legs leave the ground at the start and he breaks poorly. Of course, all horses' legs are off the ground a bit, but in this instance, he is well up in the air, compromising his position. Note : In the vast majority of instances, horses that break in the air should be carried as a "good for all but.." in the start line.
Broke In Tangle
Used at the start when a horse gets away awkwardly or the ground breaks away under him. It takes him a while to find his best stride. Note : Generally, horses that break in a tangle should be listed as good for all but... in the start line.
Broke Sharply
See AWAY ALERTLY.
Broke Slowly
Used at the start when the horse has no other excuse other than the fact that he broke a bit behind the rest of the field. He was not bumped, steadied, bobbled or unprepared for the start, just came away from the gate a bit tardy.
Broke Through Gate
Used at the start when a horse forces his way through the starting gate prior to the start.
Broken Equipment
Self explanatory. Note: When horses bear out or bolt on the turns, it is a good idea to check to see if the horse has some broken equipment. (broken rein, iron, etc.).
Brushed
When a horse either makes slight contact with a rival or has the contact initiated by another horse (similar to "bumped" but less severe).
Bucked
Generally used at the start or shortly thereafter. Instead of settling into stride, a horse is erratic and rank, looking similar to a bucking horse in the rodeo.
Bumped
Used when a horse is bumped by another horse is the horse who initiates the bumping. Should be accompanied by another explanatory work such as bumped rival or bumped by rival.
Came Again
Applies when a horse has the lead, loses it to a rival, then regains ground. The horse does not necessarily have to win, but should be gaining ground on the leaders at the finish.
Carried Out
As implied, this term is to be used when a horse is forced out by another rival.
Chased
When a horse is running in close attendance to the leader without challenging for the lead.
Checked
Applies when a rider has to take up on his mount, changing his stride due to the fact that he has encountered traffic trouble. INTERCHANGEABLE WITH STEADIED.
Checked Repeatedly
Used when a horse has to steady or take up a number of times when racing in tight quarters. See CHECKED for a more detailed explanation.
Circled Field
Used when a horse is forced to go widest to reach contention. It is applicable when a horse must pass four or more rivals.
Clipped Heels
When a horse runs up behind a rival, or is caught in tight quarters and his front legs clip the hind legs of the horse directly in front of him. This can be determined due to the fact that the jockey on the horse must take up sharply on his horse, altering his stride dramatically. In many instances, the jockey may lose his irons in the process, or the horse may fall.
Closed Fast
When a horse is finishing the race with good speed, gaining lengths on the leaders.
Closed Gap
When a horse gains ground on the leaders through the stretch run.
Close Up
When a horse is racing in good position, generally a few lengths behind the leaders.
Closed Willingly
When a horse makes up ground steadily through the late stages of a race.
Closed With A Rush
When a horse is moving fastest of all through the late stages of a race, gaining on the leaders with every stride.
Contended
When a horse is within striking range, generally within eight lengths of the leaders.
Disliked Track
In most instances, this term should be used when horses are running over an "off" track. Horses that appear to be unable to settle into stride (i.e.climbing) and do not seems to get untracked during any portion of the race.
Distanced
When a horse is badly outrun (generally 25 lengths or more behind the next closest finisher) but still finishes the race.
Drew Clear
When a horse moves to the lead at a point in the race and opens up a margin over the closest pursuer of two lengths or more.
Drew Even
When a horse draws nose to nose with the leader.
Drew Off
Term describes a horse that has gained the lead, then opens a clear advantage. It is used ONLY when a horse is in front. However, it does not necessarily mean that a horse has to win (e.g. drew off turn, weakened mid stretch).
Drifted
This term is a less severe description of horses that BORE OUT or BOLTED. It pertains only to a horse's course through the stretch run and can be determined only by reviewing the head on shot of the video tape replay. Horses that drift do so gradually. Any other more deliberate movements to the outside should be classified as BORE OUT or BOLTED.
Driving
Used only for the winner. It describes a horse that is under constant pressure, either through whipping or a strong hand ride to prevail.
Dropped Back
As logic would indicate, this term should be used to describe a horse that raced close up during the early portion of a race, then lost ground. Generally, it should be used in conjunction with BRIEF SPEED.
Ducked In Gap
Used when a horse ducks into a gap between the temporary railing put up for some races that come out of a chute, then makes a sharp left hand turn onto the main track.
Dueled
Used when two or more horses are head and head for the lead for an extended period of time.
Dull Effort
Used when a horse fails to be a factor at any point during the race. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH A NUMBER OF OTHERS, INCLUDING NO THREAT, NO FACTOR, FAILED TO MENACE, TRAILED THROUGHOUT, ETC.
Dwelt
Term used only at the start. Describes a horse that stays in the gate after the rest of the field has broken. He then breaks several lengths behind the rest of the field.
Eased
A situation when a horse is well behind the leaders and his rider has determined that he is hopelessly beaten and allows him to gallop along under no pressure.
Easily
When a horse wins a race and is under no pressure at any point during the race to control his rivals.
Empty
When a horse is in contention, then is asked to respond by his jockey, either through the use of the whip or strong hand urging. If the horse does not respond to these tactics, he comes up EMPTY.
Erratic
A horse races erratically when he "runs in spots", in other words, he moves to contention, drops back, comes on again, drops back, etc. Also, young horses with little or no racing experience could race erratically, swerving in and out and could be used in this instance instead of GREENLY.
Evenly
When a horse maintains a relative position behind the leaders throughout the entire race and never offers much of a bid.
Faded
When a horse races in contention during the early stages of a race, then drops back.
Failed To Menace
Another term which describes a horse's entire performance. A horse that raced near the back of the field the entire way and did not offer a bid or gain significantly on the leaders at any point. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH NO THREAT, FAILED TO RESPOND, ETC.
Failed To Respond
Nearly the same as FAILED TO MENACE with one subtle difference. If a jockey is noticeably attempting to get his horse to get untracked and he does not react, he has FAILED TO RESPOND.
Failed To Sustain Bid
Applies when a horse moves to contention at some point during the race, then lacks a further response and either finishes evenly or drops back.
Faltered
This term, along with quite a few other comments describes a horse that gives ground during a race. In other words, he backs off the leaders, generally in the late stages. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH WEAKENED, TIRED, GAVE WAY, ETC.
Far Back
When a horse is more than 20 lengths behind the leaders.
Fast Pace
When the leading horses in a race set fractional times that are substantially faster than normal for the distance.
Fell
As implied, this term is used when a horse falls. This could be caused by a number of factors, including clipping heels, stumbling, breaking down, or even taking a bad step. FELL should be accompanied by another explanatory comment such as CLIPPED HEELS, STUMBLED,FELL OVER RIVAL, ETC.
Finished Well
A horse that closed a good deal of ground through the stretch run. IT MAY BE INTERCHANGEABLE WITH FOUND BEST STRIDE LATE.
Fixed Shoe
A horse that throws his shoe, either in the paddock or during the post parade and has to be returned to the paddock to be reshod.
Flattened Out
When a horse moves to a contending position, then cannot gain significantly and finishes evenly.
Flipped In Gate
Term used only at the start. It refers to a horse that is acting up in the gate, then rears up and either falls backward or becomes hung up in the gate. In nearly all instances, the horse also loses his rider in the process.
Forced Out
A horse that is forced to race wide due to the fact that another horse is either getting out or bolting. It is also possible that there are three or four horses across the track which forces a horse very wide to gain contention. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH CARRIED OUT.
Forced Wide
See FORCED OUT.
Fractious In Gate
Used only at the start, this term is used for horses that are acting up more than normal in the starting gate, and possibly for a horse that unseats his rider or takes an unusually long time in entering the starting gate.
Fractious Post Parade
As logic would indicate, this term is for a horse that is acting up considerably during the post parade. He could be lunging in the air, running off despite the efforts of his jockey, or generally being unruly.
Full Of Run
When a horse is gaining ground quickly on the leaders during the stretch run.
Fully Extended
When a horse wins a race but has been put to extreme pressure by his rider to hold off rivals.
Gained Command
See ASSUMED COMMAND.
Gaining
Although this term is similar to FOUND BEST STRIDE LATE and FINISHED WELL, there is a subtle difference in that this type of rally is more of a slow, steady gain rather than a quicker burst of speed associated with the other two terms.
Gamely
A horse that narrowly misses victory. He has either dueled for command from the outset and gave way grudgingly in the late stages, or set all the pace and just missed.
Gave Way
Another term for a horse that loses ground after becoming a factor during some stage of the race.
Good Early Speed
A horse that breaks alertly, shows races up near the leaders, then tires.
Good Effort
Term similar to GAMELY, but has a slightly different connotation. This is more of an editorial comment for a horse that turned in a solid performance, but failed to come away with a victory for any number of reasons. He could have overcome traffic problems, dueled for command throughout, or may have been forced to race wide throughout while finishing well and may have been best with better racing luck.
Good Position
When a horse is well placed off the leaders, offering the opportunity to rally for the victory.
Got Through
When a horse is able to successfully move into an opening, either along the rail or between horses.
Greenly
Generally used for horses with little or no racing experience. They either race forwardly, drop back, the come again, or weave in and out during the stretch run. This term is similar to, but not exactly the same as ERRATIC.
Handily
Term applies only to a winner. Describes a horse that is well in command during the final furlong, is under no encouragement, and is taken well in hand by his rider.
Hard Used
A horse that was hard ridden during some stage of the race, generally to keep up with another horse while dueling for the lead. In most instances, a horse that is hard used will tire during the late stages.
Headed
When a horse has the lead, then another rival briefly gains a short advantage. Generally this term is used when the horse in question retakes the lead at another point in the race.
Held Place
When a horse finishes second but has enough left to hold off the rest of the field.
Held Well
When a horse finished well enough to hold his position through the stretch run.
Hit Gate
Term used only at the start. A horse that bounces off the side of the gate at the break due to one of a number of factors. This incident can only be seen through reviewing the head on video tape replay of the race.
Hit Rail
As implied, this term is used for a horse that hits the inner rail at some point during the race. A horse could hit the rail for a number of reasons including ducking in and hitting the rail due to his own efforts, or being forced in by another horse when in tight quarters, hitting the rail.
Hit With Rival's Whip
This generally occurs during the stretch drive when two horses are dueling for the lead and are lapped on one another. With both riders hitting their mounts, it is possible for one horse to be hit by the other rider's whip inadvertently.
Hustled Along
A horse that is being kept to urging, either by the use of the whip or strong hand urging to keep up or maintain position.
Hung
A horse that looks like he is going to emerge as the winner, driving right up alongside the leader(s) but just does not have enough to go by, and flattens out or finishes evenly.
In Hand
Term describing a riding style in which a jockey is trying to conserve a horse's energy for the later stages of a race. It can be used for a horse running on the lead, with the rider slowing down the pace, or for a late running sort who does not want to be rushed before launching his bid.
In Tight
A horse that is experiencing traffic troubles during a certain point of the race. If a horse lacks racing room due to bunching of the field, or his rider has to check or steady in traffic, he is IN TIGHT.
Inside
Term describing a horse's positioning on the track. It is particularly effective for handicappers who are trying to determine track bias and for trip handicappers. It is just as important as noting how wide a horse has raced.
Jockey Claimed Foul
This term is helpful, especially when a jockey has claimed foul against another horse in the field and the stewards determined that there was insufficient evidence to warrant a disqualification. Obviously, the rider felt that he was impeded in some manner and should be a benefit to the handicapper in the horse's next outing.
Just Failed
When the horse has the lead but is narrowly beaten by a rival in the late going.
Just Lasted
A term similar to ALL OUT describing a horse who was struggling to hold on to a diminishing lead, but did hang on for the victory. The term JUST LASTED should be used only for a horse that wins.
Just Missed
A horse that, as opposed to one that JUST LASTED, was gaining ground with every stride and with just a bit more ground, would likely have emerged with a win. Obviously, horses that just missed would have been beaten in a photo finish.
Jumped Tracks
In most instances this would refer to a horse that had jumped tracks left across the racing surface by the starting gate. This horse left his feet and was thrown off stride.
Jumped Shadow
A horse that jumps shadows that cover the track from time to time. As with JUMPED TRACKS, the horse left his feet and was thrown off stride for a brief time.
Lacked Late Response
A horse that has moved to contention, then lacks that final closing kick that could carry him to victory, or a horse that is well placed from the outset, but cannot muster a rally.
Late Gain
When a horse closes ground through the stretch run, finishing closer to the leaders than he was when entering the stretch.
Late Rally
As with a number of other terms such as FINISHED WELL, GAINING, and FOUND BEST STRIDE LATE, this describes a horse that is steadily closing ground through the stretch run after racing off the pace.
Lead Between Calls
This term is especially helpful for handicappers who are reviewing race result information. Sometimes a horse gains the lead between our points of call, then is not in front at the next point of call. This insight will provide serious handicappers with additional information.
Led Throughout
A horse that wins the race in front running fashion, leading virtually every step of the way.
Left Handed Urging
A horse that was under strong left handed whipping by his rider.
Long Drive
A horse that was kept to pressure for an unusually long period of time . Most horses have a burst of speed for about an eighth of a mile, however, others can prevail after a prolonged drive and this in when this term comes into use.
Loomed Boldly
When a horse moves rapidly to challenge for the lead.
Lost Action
A horse that does not have a smooth stride. The reasons for a horse to lose action are varied, but can include that he disliked the track, has to steady for some reason or another, or was rank.
Lost Ground
When a horse loses lengths between one point and another in the race. In many instances, a horse loses ground when he is forced to race wide or encounters traffic problems.
Lost Irons
When a jockey loses one or both of his stirrups during the race. In many instances a rider loses his irons at the start, due to the fact that a horse does not break cleanly and throws him off balance, or when a horse stumbles or checks sharply in traffic. The best way to find if a rider lost his irons is to closely review the head on video tape replay.
Lost Jockey
This occurs when a rider falls off his horse for any of a number of reasons. Horses lose their riders frequently at the start when they stumble, or when a rider has to avoid other fallen horses or riders during a spill.
Lost Whip
This applies to a jockey who has lost his whip during the running of a race. Again, close attention to the head on shot of the video tape replay will show this. Note : When a rider loses his whip, it is important to indicate where he lost it.
Lugged In
This term is the exact opposite of LUGGED OUT. IT IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH BORE IN.
Lugged Out
A horse that pulls outward, generally during the stretch run despite his rider's efforts.. It can be best seen by reviewing the head on video replay. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH BORE OUT.
Lunged Start
As implied, this term is used only at the start and describes a horse that lunges into the air at the break. It is essentially the same as BROKE IN AIR, but not quite as severe.
Middle Move
This term is another designed to help the serious handicapper. A middle move occurs when a horse moves quickly to contention during the middle stages of a race, then lacks a further response and finishes evenly.
Middle Of Pack
When a horse races in the mid range of horses in the field. (e.g. a horse running fifth, sixth or seventh in a field of twelve is racing in the middle of the pack).
Mild Bid
When a horse makes a slight gain in position to move within challenging range.
Mild Rally
As with a number of other terms, this describes when a horse makes up ground during the stretch run. In this instance, the gain is minimal.
Moderate Pace
When the fractional times of a race are slightly slower than the norm for the distance.
Much The Best
Used only with a horse that has won the race. He drew out to an authoritative win, and as indicated, was a superior animal on this particular day.
Never Far Back
A horse that raced in contention during the early stages of a race. He was racing in good position. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH WELL PLACED.
Nicely Rated
This term should be used to describe a riding style in which a jockey did a good job of either slowing down the pace, or conserving a horse's energy. A horse that was nicely rated was allowed to relax, and more often than not produced a good effort.
No Excuse
As implied, this refers to a horse that was well placed within striking distance, but failed to produce the needed winning response.
No Factor
A horse that failed to be prominent at any point in the race.
No Match For Winner
This term should be used only with a horse that has finished second. In this instance the winner was a clearly superior animal, but the horse in question was second best.
No Rally
When a horse is in position to be a sharp factor, then lacked the needed response once called upon. THIS TERM IN INTERCHANGEABLE WITH FAILED TO RESPOND, LACKED LATE RESPONSE.
No Speed
Term applies to a horse that shows no speed at all during the entire race. It is an alternative to NO FACTOR or OUTRUN.
No Threat
Used to describe a horse that runs an even race and was not really a factor at any point. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH NO FACTOR.
Off Slowly
Term used only at the start. As with its opposite AWAY ALERTLY, we are referring to a horse that breaks cleanly, but a few lengths slower than the rest of the field. Horses that are off slowly do not necessarily have to be noted in the "good for all but..." category in the start line. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH BROKE SLOWLY.
Outfinished
Used to describe a horse that is in sharp contention during the late stages of a race, then lacked the needed surge to gain a victory. He may be turning in his best effort, but may not be good enough on this particular day.
Outrun
Term applies to a horse's entire performance when he races well back during the entire race. He was either overmatched or for some reason or other was never a factor in the outcome. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH NO THREAT OR NO FACTOR.
Passed Tiring Rivals
A horse that is gaining position, but only due to the fact that others in the race are tiring and he is finishing evenly. The horse in question is moving up in racing position (i.e. moving from eighth to sixth position), but is not gaining ground significantly on the leaders.
Perfect Trip
This term is another used as an aid to the serious handicappers, and in particular, trip handicappers. It describes a horse that has experienced no traffic trouble during the race and was not forced to race wide at any point (saved ground).
Pinched Back
Term generally used at the start. It is used when a horse is forced to steady slightly when one rival comes in and another comes out, with the horse in question left with no room to run, therefore steadying or checking. It can also be used during the running of a race. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH IN TIGHT.
Pressed Pace
This term refers to a case where a horse has good speed and is forcing the pace set by a rival or rivals.
Prevailed
This term is used only for a winner. It describes a situation when a horse has been put to an extended drive with stiff competition and emerged with a game win.
Probably Best
When a horse should have won the race, but does not due to factors such as having to steady at a critical point in the race, racing wide, etc.
Pulled Up
Term used to describe a horse that does not finish a race. His jockey is trying to bring his mount to a complete stop due to a number of reasons, generally unsoundness.
Quick Move
When a horse gains lengths on the leader very rapidly.
Rallied
This term is another for horses that are gaining ground significantly through the stretch run. IT IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH CLOSED WILLINGLY, FINISHED WELL AND LATE RALLY.
Ran Off Post Parade
A horse that is fractious or rank in the post parade and gets the best of his rider and runs off prior or during the warm up period.
Rank
Used to describe a horse that is fighting his jockey and is unmanageable.
Refused To Break
Used only at the start. A horse who stands in the gate after the starter has opened the gates and will not come out. Note : Horses that refuse to break MUST be listed as a "good for all but..." in the start line.
Returned Lame
A horse that returns to be unsaddled following the running or a race that is limping noticeably.
Returned Sore
A horse that returned sore is one that is walking gingerly when returning to be unsaddled. When he stops to have his saddle removed, he may stand with his legs spread unusually far apart. Use this term with discretion.
Ridden Out
Term used only to describe a winner. A RIDDEN OUT winner is one who is under intermittent urging (whipping) by his rider or under a mild hand ride through the final furlong.
Right Handed Urging
This term applies to a horse that in under right handed whipping.
Rough Trip
Used to describe a horse that experienced a number of incidents that compromised his chances of winning. (e.g. a horse that steadied at the start, was in tight on the turn, forced was forced to alter course, etc.).
Roughed
Used to describe a horse that has experienced traffic problems. His jockey has been forced to steady due to the fact that a rival has impeded his progress. He has been bumped and jostled around.
Roused
When a hockey asks his mount to respond, either by strong hand urging or by using the whip.
Rushed To Contention
This occurs when a horse makes a quick move to become a sharp factor. He may either sustain his bid, or flatten out.
Rushed To Lead
When a horse makes a quick move from off the leaders to take command.
Saddle Slipped
This term is used when a chartcaller observes that the saddle on a horse has moved either backward or sideways due to the fact that the girth, which holds the saddle in place has not been tightened properly. When a horse's saddle slips, in most instances the jockey loses proper balance and cannot control his mount.
Savaged
Term applies when a horse that is quite competitive is dueling with another rival and he reaches out, attempting to bite them. This term generally shows up well when reviewing the head on video tape replay.
Saved Ground
This term is used to describe the trip that the horse had during the race. If a horse is allowed to stay inside, just off the inner rail throughout, he SAVED GROUND.
Second Best
Obviously, this term is used for a horse that finishes second, and is clearly superior to the rest of horses in the field.
Second Flight
When a horse is racing in the second group of horses in a race. Generally there is a group of horses dueling for the lead, then another group a few lengths back. A horse in the second group is racing in the second flight.
Set Pace
This term describes a situation where a horse is leading at any point during a race. (e.g. SET PACE for a half, SET PACE to deep stretch, etc.).
Set Pressured Pace
When a horse is racing on the lead, but has a rival in close pursuit less than a length back.
Showed Little
This term is another used to describe a horse's entire race. If he was not in contention at any point, he SHOWED LITTLE. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH NO FACTOR, NO THREAT, OUTRUN, ETC.
Shuffled Back
In most instances, this term is used at the start, when a horse becomes sandwiched between rivals. He does not have to steady sharply, however he does lose valuable position. This term may also be used when horses are bunched and lose position.
Shut Off
This term is descriptive of a case in which a horse is caught in traffic with no racing room. In most instances the jockey will have to take up when in this situation.
Slow Early
This term is generally reserved for stretch runners. Many horses have to settle into stride for a period of time before launching their bid and this is a good descriptive term to categorize this running style.
Slow Pace
When the fractional times of a race are substantially slower than the average times for that distance.
Speed
This term should be used in conjunction with a position on the track to indicate that a horse was prominent to this point (e.g. speed to upper stretch).
Split Horses
As implied, this term refers to a horse that moves between horses to gain contention.
Squeezed
Term generally used at the start. It occurs when a horse is sandwiched between rivals, losing valuable ground. IT IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH PINCHED BACK.
Stalked Pace
used to describe a situation when a horse is allowed to press the pace while still in hand. IT IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH PRESSED PACE.
Steadied
This term is interchangeable with CHECKED and refers to a condition when a jockey has to take a strong hold on his mount due to the fact that he is experiencing traffic trouble. In most cases, a horse that has to steady is thrown off stride momentarily. If the steadying incident is not severe you may use steadied briefly, or if the incident in more pronounced, steadied sharply.
Steady Advance
This term may be used to describe a horse that made constant, even progress to contention.
Stopped
This term is a description of a horse who gives way suddenly or races forwardly and tires badly.
Stumbled
This occurs when a horse either loses his footing at the start and is scrambling to regain his best stride, or when he is caught in tight quarters and forced to steady. Another possibility is when a horse clips a rival's heels.
Swerved
As implied, this term is used when a horse changes course suddenly, either inward or outward.
Swung Wide
When a horse is taken farther out from the inner rail to secure racing room.
Taken Back
When a horse is restrained by his rider during the early stages of a race. In most instances, this tactic is used by a rider when the pace is too fast, or to allow a late running horse to settle into stride before launching his bid.
Taken Up
Another term to describe a horse that encounters traffic problems, forcing his rider to pull up on the reins. It generally forces a horse to alter his stride and lose ground.
Tired
Term used when a horse races forwardly for some period during the race, then loses ground. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH GAVE WAY, WEAKENED, FALTERED, ETC.
Through After Half
When a horse is prominent during the first half mile of a race, either setting or prompting the pace, then tires significantly.
Through Early
When a horse shows brief speed then drops back during the early stages of a race.
Trailed
This self explanatory term is used when a horse is racing last during any portion of the race.
Unchallenged
When a horse is racing on the lead with no pressure exerted by his rivals.
Unhurried Early
This term is used to describe a horse that is allowed to settle into stride before launching his bid. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH ALLOWED TO SETTLE.
Unprepared Start
There are a number of instances when this term can be used. The most common is when a horse has his head turned sideways when the starter opens the gate and breaks poorly. There are also instances when the rider is unprepared for the start.
Unruly Gate
See FRACTIOUS IN GATE.
Up In Final Strides
As implied, this term is used to describe a situation in which a horse rallied from off the pace, then finishes determinedly to get the victory in the late stages. Note : This term is used only with a horse that won.
Up For Place
When a horse finishes well to gain the runner up spot.
Used Up
A horse that has been under pressure to prompt the pace, or a horse that was hustled to set the early pace and tires.
Vied For Lead
When a horse is dueling for command with another rival or rivals.
Void Early Speed
This term is another for a late running horse who is allowed to settle before launching his bid. THIS TERM IS INTERCHANGEABLE WITH ALLOWED TO SETTLE AND UNHURRIED EARLY.
Washy Post Parade
This is another term which should prove very beneficial to serious handicappers. It should be used when a horse is unusually wet when coming onto the track and in some instances is lathered up in the neck area and between his hind legs. Note : In some instances, on very hot days all horses will be wet on the track. Use this term ONLY when a horse's condition is not comparable with others in the field.
Weakened
This common term is the same as TIRED or GAVE WAY. The horse has raced forwardly, then gave ground.
Well Handled
When a horse is on the lead and the jockey allows him to relax nicely, many times slowing down the pace to increase his chance of victory.
Well Placed
When a horse is well within striking position.
Well Rated
This term is a comment on the jockey's handling of his mount. It generally applies to a horse that is on the lead and the jockey allows his mount to relax nicely, many times slowing down the pace to enhance his chance of victory.
Wheeled Gate
Used only at the start. This term refers to an instance when a horse makes either a sharp right or left turn immediately out of the starting gate and is pulled up.
Wide Early
As implied, this term can be used when a horse is forced to race wide during the early stages of a race. Use this term when a horse is a least five or more horses wide.
Wore Down Rivals
Use this term only with winners. This describes a horse who closed determinedly to get up for victory after a prolonged drive.
Wouldn't Load Gate
Self explanatory term for a horse who is fractious entering the starting gate and delays the start for an unusual period of time.